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Doctrine to Life

Did you forget everything you learned in Shepherdess training?

Over at The Resurgence, Justin Holcomb has “taken a good book and highlighted the big ideas and key takeaways…” helping us all recall the main points from How People Change. Quick quiz; what are the four images from Jeremiah 17.5-10 that help us apply the big picture of the Bible? Hint; heat….

Helping people change….their circumstances?

If you’ve heard me speak anywhere –ever- you’ve heard me say two things…(well, to be honest, I say a whole lot more than two things; but work with me) First, when we walk alongside someone who is struggling or suffering, their primary desire is to change their circumstances. And second? More than likely no one can change their circumstances… So how do they live in the middle of a mess? How do we encourage those whose lives are crumbling? In this podcast Tim Keller beautifully illustrates a peace that is unshakeable. Pull up a comfy chair and get out a pen, make sure to take lots of notes to share from this powerful message. 

Where, in scripture, do we find the commandments?

My two daughters and their families were spending Thanksgiving weekend with us a few years back and one of them was lamenting about a particular crisis she was concerned for. The other daughter, the only person alive who can speak to her sister this way said, “stop worrying…anxiety is a sin!” Suddenly a voice listening from upstairs could be heard exclaiming, “it is?!?”

Where do we find the commandments in the Bible? If we limit what God has required of us to the passages that record the 10 commandments we are missing a good deal of the Father’s instructions. The only difference between the commands “do not covet” and “do not worry” is the subject of which God speaks. Both, however, begin with the same imperative; “do not.” As a matter of fact, coveting leads to worry! We covet and can’t have (material possessions, physical attributes or health, talents and gifts) and then anxiously take our circumstances into our control. In both cases we believe God is simply not good enough and this is a sin against him.

Pastor Jullian Freeman shares the difference between what the world calls stress and the Bible names anxiety. Paul Tautges also addresses this very important teaching from Matthew 6.25-34 and highlights seven things we can learn from the passage.

Anxiety is one of a woman’s most prevalent struggles! Click on the pastor’s name to read how you can help your lamb understand God’s instruction and blessing from obeying this very important command.

Hym.nol.ogy

My apologies. The first time I linked Hym.no.logy to a hymn I simply led you to the words. In the future I will do my best to find a link that shares the beautiful music sung.

Little is known about Kathrina von Schlegel. She was known to have lived in Cothen, Germany, authored 29 hymns, and died in 1768. “Be Still, My Soul” is her only known hymn to have been translated, and thankfully so!  The words of “Be Still, My Soul” faithfully reminds us that the Father is for us, He is trustworthy and faithful, and that the end to all of our suffering is joy.

Be Still, my soul: the Lord is on thy side.

Bear patiently, the cross of grief or pain.

Leave to thy God to order and provide;

In every change, He faithful will remain.

Be still, my soul: thy best, thy heav’nly Friend

Through thorny ways leads to a joyful end.

Click here to read the rich words in the rest of this song. Click Hym.no.logy to hear Libera, an all boy English vocal group sing their rendition.

Wish I’d said that

The Psalmist “did not rely on his own judgment simply but 

Took Counsel From The Word Of God.”

John Calvin Commentary on Psalm 119.24

“Thy testimonies also are my delight; They are my counselors.”

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